Monthly Archives: April 2015

Prince George Derby Doc Crashes into DOXA

Kurt Walker and Tyson Storozinski at Vancity Theatre, where their debut doc 'Hit 2 Pass' will screen May 9. Photo by Jackie Dives.

Kurt Walker and Tyson Storozinski at Vancity Theatre, where their debut doc ‘Hit 2 Pass’ will screen May 9. Photo by Jackie Dives.

A pair of young B.C. filmmakers are making international waves with their avant-garde take on a Prince George demolition derby.

Kurt Walker’s debut documentary feature, Hit 2 Pass, is titled after a derby of the same name in the northern B.C. city. The film has muscled its way into the international festival circuit — it made its roaring debut at the Doclisboa International Film Festival in Portugal, where it picked up the Universities Award for Best International Competition Feature Film, and is headed for an American debut in Brooklyn next month. But first, the film will debut in the director’s hometown at the upcoming DOXA Film Festival in Vancouver….

Read the full Q+A on The Tyee

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Freak Cold Snap Destroys Millions of Seedlings for B.C. Reforestation

Nurseries like this one grow seedlings to be planted in B.C. forests. Photo by Jeremy Hieber

Nurseries like this one grow seedlings to be planted in B.C. forests. Photo by Jeremy Hieber

Provincial reforestation efforts will be delayed in southern B.C. this spring after more than 2 million seedlings were severely damaged by unpredictable weather.

According to government officials, approximately 2.5 million trees that were to be planted in the area were severely damaged by polar winds. That number represents about five per cent of the 50 million seedlings scheduled to be planted this spring by the B.C. government.

The affected trees are too damaged to be planted, putting some reforestation efforts on hold. The tree planting was scheduled to begin across B.C. this month…

Read the full story on The Tyee


Sto:lo Nation Elders Lodge has growing wait list

Mary Emery sits quietly with her walker. Photo by Ricardo Khayatte

Mary Emery sits quietly with her walker. Photo by Ricardo Khayatte

When Bernice Williams wheels herself through the halls of her home, she passes by a framed obituary of her uncle, just one of many memoirs of the Sto:lo Nation’s most influential elders that hang on the walls.

After suffering years of domestic abuse and living on the streets of Chilliwack, B.C. without a home, Williams was able to find shelter in the Sto:lo Nation Elders Lodge — the only assisted-living facility for aboriginal seniors in British Columbia.

“I’m in a good place. I’ll never be homeless; I’ll never be hungry again. No beatings, no more black eyes, no more fat lips, no more broken bones — unless I fall down or something,” she said…

Read the story on CBC News British Columbia, including the radio version featured on Vancouver’s Early Edition

Read the story on UBC’s Indigenous Reporting webpage

Written by Jon Hernandez and Ricardo Khayatte


The Rock Doc: On the road with aspiring folk rockers The River and the Road

Read the follow up to our first documentary feature on The Thunderbird

Directed, edited and produced by Jon Hernandez and Jordan Wong


Record Store Day: A Hipster’s Black Friday

Long live the independent record store! Illustration by Brandon Cotter

Long live the independent record store! Illustration by Brandon Cotter

It’s that magical time of the year again where the music aficionados of Vancouver get tostorm the city’s record stores in search of great deals, live shows, and that golden vinyl that’s been evading them for so manyyears. But more importantly, it’s a chance to celebrate the great revival: the resurgence ofthe independent record store, and the unique culture that comes with it.

What most vinyl collectors will agree on is the record store atmosphere: music you’ve never heard spinning off the speakers, walls of pretty album covers that keep you occupied for hours, and a person behind the counter that knows way more about music than you do. In short, walking into these shops and picking up an album is a lot more fun than downloading anything online. And providing this experience is something that many record retailers across the city take pride in. “We’re trying to really celebrate the art, the artistic aspect of record collecting,” says Daniel Geddes, musician and co-founder of Horses Records, one of Vancouver’s newest vinyl shops. “We see records as the best way to listen to and collect music, and that’s one facet of our interest in art in general. The store is a celebration of intellect and creativity.”

Read the rest of the article in Discorder Magazine