Monthly Archives: May 2015

Republished on Exclaim: ‘The River, the Road’ (mini-documentary)

Andrew Phelan and Keenan Lawlor of The River and the Road

Andrew Phelan and Keenan Lawlor of The River and the Road

Today (May 12), Vancouver folk rockers the River and the Road are releasing their album Headlights through MapleMusic Records, and for listeners who are interested in learning a little more about the band, they are now the subjects of a 14-minute mini-doc.

The featurette is titled The River, the Road. It follows the Vancouverites to Prince George, BC, for what’s described as “one of their strangest gigs to date”: as the musical act of a Rogers Hometown Hockey event. It features intimate performance footage along with interview clips, and we learn about the band’s history, tour habits, and their struggles to find success as indie musicians.

Read the rest of the article on Exclaim

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Genderdog: Taking Baby Steps, One International Tour at a Time

Ben, Katie and Christine form Vancouver's Genderdog. Photo by Jaqueline Manoukian

Ben, Katie and Christine form Vancouver’s Genderdog. Photo by Jaqueline Manoukian

At the magical hour of 5 p.m., on the corner of Hastings and Renfrew, it didn’t take me long to recognize the trio I had never met nor seen, yet was assigned to interview. Christine B., Ben E., and Katie E. walked, or should I say, were dragged towards me by the unofficial mascot for their band Genderdog: a two year old black-and-white pooch named Heffer.

The dog immediately jumped me, contrary to the orders given by his owners, Ben and Katie. The band offered me a beer afterwards, perhaps to make up from Heffer’s enjoyable assault. I carefully contemplated the ethics behind the offer — as a responsible journalist, I surely shouldn’t accept. But every man has a code, and mine would be sorely violated by turning down an ice-cold bevy. I sat down and enjoyed a drink with Genderdog. Getting to know them, and how they formed, was easy.

“I think we were always surrounded by friends who played music in their bands and we just wanted to do it ourselves,” said Katie, bassist and vocalist for the group. “We thought there was no good reason we shouldn’t do it.”

Read the full article on Discorder Magazine


Mud, Sweat and Tears: The Gruelling Life of a Tree Planter

Jonathan 'Scooter' Clark, above, has worked as a tree planter in British Columbia for 25 years. Photo: Replant.ca.

Jonathan ‘Scooter’ Clark, above, has worked as a tree planter in British Columbia for 25 years. Photo: Replant.ca.

When Jonathan “Scooter” Clark began planting trees for a living in 1990, his work camp was “bush league” at best. By comparison, the modern-day tree planters seem like a spoiled bunch. “We had two station wagons in our first camp, and a couple of two-wheel-drive trucks,” said Clark, 46, who works in a camp that today uses all-terrain vehicles, four-wheel-drive trucks, and even helicopters.

“When I started, first aid was rudimentary,” he continued. “We had no such thing as dry tents.” As most tree planters can attest, a dry tent is both a refuge and a stink shack: a communal place where planters can hang their wet and dirty clothes to dry after a day spent working in the rain and mud. In the new age of tree planting, the thought of not having one in camp is just cruel.

“Over 20 years, I think camps have gotten a lot better, the industry has gotten a lot safer. A lot more money has gone to comfort,” added the 25-year veteran…

Read the rest of the article on the Tyee


Hakai Magazine Looks to Make Waves Worldwide

Editor Jude Isabella: 'The launch of Hakai is an important moment in journalism.'

Editor Jude Isabella: ‘The launch of Hakai is an important moment in journalism.’

Looking for a great story? Head for the coast. That’s the mission given to a team of journalists now fanning out all over the world, from their base in Victoria, B.C.

They write and shoot for Hakai Magazine, a brand new online publication that focuses entirely on the planet’s coastlines, bringing untold or unheralded stories of shoreline science and culture to light. Writers work side-by-side with some of the world’s leading researchers to transform scientific discovery into compelling tales. Features include how fuzzy raccoons are decimating crab populations in the Gulf Islands, what weird stuff artists have sunk to the bottom of the sea, and why thousands of walruses are storming the Alaskan shores….

Read the rest of our Q+A on the Tyee

Read the rest of our Q+A on J-Source