Monthly Archives: December 2015

B.C. restaurant helping give cancer the kiss-off with annual BACIO fundraiser

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Since opening in 2007, Mangia E Bevi Ristorante has donated over $270,000 to oncology research at BC Children’s Hospital and Lions Gate Hospital. Photo by Rafal Gerszak/Globe and Mail.

When lifelong friends Doug Grisdale, Rob Parrott and Antonio Sauro decided to open a restaurant on the North Shore, they knew that fighting cancer would be on the menu.

Since opening in 2007, their fine-dining restaurant, Mangia E Bevi Ristorante, has donated more than $270,000 to oncology research and treatment at the BC Children’s Hospital and Lions Gate Hospital. The money is generated through their annual fundraiser, Because a Cure is Obtainable – or BACIO, the Italian word for kiss.

The team was inspired to give to the local hospitals after the disease took hold of their loved ones.

“In 2005, Rob’s daughter – she was 7 at the time –[contracted] a brain tumour,” Mr. Grisdale said. “She survived it through treatment at the BC’s Children’s Hospital.”

Read the rest of the article on the Globe and Mail

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Freshwater salmon have ‘exceptional’ rebound in B.C.’s Okanagan lakes

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Restored habitat, better watershed data and volunteer efforts have been given credit for allowing the first full recreational kokanee fishery this year in four years. Photo by Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press

Freshwater salmon stocks have increased dramatically in Okanagan lakes this year, even though populations of Pacific salmon have plummeted in the nearby Columbia River system.

A recently released provincial government survey found kokanee spawners in Okanagan Lake, for example, reached a high of 336,500 – the largest quantity since the province started keeping track of the population in 1992.

Restored habitat, better watershed data and volunteer efforts have been given credit for allowing the first full recreational kokanee fishery this year in four years.

“The Okanagan showed exceptional numbers of spawning for adult kokanee this year – up to doubling, or even tripling of the average numbers,” said Kim Hyatt, a research scientist at Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

Read the full article on The Globe and Mail