Monthly Archives: June 2016

B.C.’s ‘Bollywood Boyz’ slam their way to the big leagues

Burnaby brothers Harv (left) and Gurv Sihra (right) made their WWE debut on June 23rd. Photo provided by the Bollywood Boyz.

Burnaby brothers Harv (left) and Gurv Sihra (right) made their WWE debut on June 23rd. Photo provided by the Harv Sihra.

“You can’t hold back true talent.”

That’s what professional wrestling icon Bret ‘The Hitman’ Hart told Burnaby brothers and aspiring wrestlers Harv and Gurv Sihra in 2008, when they ran into the Canadian legend at wrestling event in Las Vegas.

“Over the last 10 years, whether we’re wrestling in front of 50 people in Winnipeg or 1,000 people in Vegas, we never forget that advice,” said Harv Sihra.

The Sihra brothers are better known by their in-ring alter egos, The Bollywood Boyz. They’re one of the highlights of the B.C.-based Elite Canadian Championship Wrestling promotion.

Once a month, you can find them sporting tights and tassels at the Russian Community Centre in Kitsilano, eliciting cheers, dancing and chants of “Butter Chicken!” from the crowd.

Read the rest of the article on CBC News

Advertisements

Province-wide slash burning sparks controversy

Slash burn is a method of getting rid of debris from logging, where piles of branches and other tree debris are burned. Photo by Denver Post via Getty Images.

Slash burn is a method of getting rid of debris from logging, where piles of branches and other tree debris are burned. Photo by Denver Post via Getty Images.

When Greg Mancuso got tired of working his regular desk job at Folklore Reforestation, he pestered his boss for a change of scenery.

Shortly after, he got what he asked for: a 12-day gig setting large piles of branches, logs and tree tops ablaze.

The job gave him some nail-biting thrills.

“When you look at the size of some of the fires that you started, it kind of makes you a little nervously excited,” he said.

Mancuso, who usually works as a project coordinator for Folklore Reforestation, would traverse fresh clear-cuts across the Prince George region and burn down large piles of woody debris known as slash.

They’re the leftovers from logging and are systematically burned every fall and winter to limit the risks of wildfire.

It’s is a common forestry practice. Just last year, an estimated five million tons of it went up in flames across the province.

Read the rest of the article on CBC News


Record warm weather continues to threaten Pacific salmon, federal panel says

Pacific salmon numbers are expected to decline over the next three years due to unusual ocean temperatures. Photo by Johathan Hayward/Canadian Press

Pacific salmon numbers are expected to decline over the next three years due to unusual ocean temperatures. Photo by Johathan Hayward/Canadian Press

Record warm temperatures along the B.C. coast are continuing to threaten Pacific salmon populations, according to a federal government update.

Unusually warm ocean conditions in 2015, spurred by both the Bloband El Nino, are expected to have lasting effects on Pacific salmon returns over the next three years, including increased mortality rates, says a report from a Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) panel of scientists.

Panel members held a news conference in Vancouver Monday to release their findings.

“We’ve seen the warmest winter temperatures [and] water temperatures ever observed in the northeast Pacific in 2014 and 2015,” said Dr. Ian Perry, a research scientist with the DFO.

The panel found that the warm temperatures have disrupted the regular food supply that Pacific salmon rely on, leading to smaller and unhealthier fish.

Read the rest of the article on CBC News