Province-wide slash burning sparks controversy

Slash burn is a method of getting rid of debris from logging, where piles of branches and other tree debris are burned. Photo by Denver Post via Getty Images.

Slash burn is a method of getting rid of debris from logging, where piles of branches and other tree debris are burned. Photo by Denver Post via Getty Images.

When Greg Mancuso got tired of working his regular desk job at Folklore Reforestation, he pestered his boss for a change of scenery.

Shortly after, he got what he asked for: a 12-day gig setting large piles of branches, logs and tree tops ablaze.

The job gave him some nail-biting thrills.

“When you look at the size of some of the fires that you started, it kind of makes you a little nervously excited,” he said.

Mancuso, who usually works as a project coordinator for Folklore Reforestation, would traverse fresh clear-cuts across the Prince George region and burn down large piles of woody debris known as slash.

They’re the leftovers from logging and are systematically burned every fall and winter to limit the risks of wildfire.

It’s is a common forestry practice. Just last year, an estimated five million tons of it went up in flames across the province.

Read the rest of the article on CBC News

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About Jon Hernandez

Jon Hernandez is a Journalist, Tree Planter, and current student at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism. He holds a Bachelors of Arts from UBC Vancouver, and has worked for such publications as The Region and Sustainability Television. View all posts by Jon Hernandez

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