Let’s go to the dam pub: Site C wants in-camp watering hole

Site C dam's 1,600 camp workers might be getting their own bar. Photo by Shutterstock.

Site C dam’s 1,600 camp workers might be getting their own bar. Photo by Shutterstock.

Workers at the Site C Dam might soon be able tip back a cold one after a long day’s work — at their own private bar.

A liquor licence application for a new Site C lounge is making it’s way through the B.C.’s liquor control branch that hopes to bring the dam’s 1,600 workers “a glass of wine on a balmy summer evening, or a warm drink on a cold winter night,” according to the proposal.

The application was made by ACTO Two Rivers, the company hired to develop Site C’s workforce housing. The proposed tavern would open up inside worker-camp dwellings, pending the approval of a liquor-primary licence from the government.

The Site C lounge would be exclusive to workers and invited guests, offering “tantalizing appetizers”, “specialty cocktails”, and a “Happy Hour atmosphere”, according to ACTO Two Rivers.

A liquor licence application went before the Peace River Regional District board on Thursday. The board decided not to comment on the application, meaning the onus is now on the Liquor Control and Licensing Branch to determine if the bar will benefit the community.

Read the rest of the article on CBC News


‘It was loud and just really scary’: Neighbour describes harrowing escape

Five children narrowly escaped their flaming Port Moody home. Their father has been charged with arson in connection with the blaze. Photo by Jon Hernandez/CBC.

Five children narrowly escaped their flaming Port Moody home. Their father has been charged with arson in connection with the blaze. Photo by Jon Hernandez/CBC.

Kylie Schlotter was getting ready to go to a friend’s wedding when she noticed flames emerging from her neighbour’s home across the street. She knew there was a large family that lived inside.

“We saw two kids climb out through the window onto the roof,” she said. “Before we knew it, there were police cars coming, and the flames started to grow in a matter of seconds.”

Five children managed to escape their Port Moody home as the flames grew behind them. Their mother was taken to the hospital with severe burns but couldn’t be saved.

Their father has been charged with second-degree murder and two counts of arson. His identity and the details of the case are protected under a publication ban.

Read the rest of the article on CBC News


City looks to jack up parking prices in the West End

The City of Vancouver is looking to increase the price of parking permits in the West End — and introduce new meters. Photo b CBC.

The City of Vancouver is looking to increase the price of parking permits in the West End — and introduce new meters. Photo b CBC.

Parking in Vancouver’s West End could get a lot pricier.

The city is sending out feelers to West End residents in the form of an online survey to find out just how many people support a potential 700 per cent increase to annual on-street parking permits.

With enough support, the city would increase the annual permit rate from $80 to $600 and eliminate free 2-hour parking spaces in favour of meters as part of the West End Parking Strategy, pending approval from council.

According to Vancouver transportation director Lon LaClaire. the price hikes will encourage current permit holders to look for alternatives and free up parking space.

“The target is that we want to have 15 per cent of the spaces of available so you don’t spend a bunch of time driving around looking for parking, adding to congestion and to the traffic problem, “said LaClaire.

The changes would reduce the maddening hunt for parking that many West End drivers endure by five minutes and one kilometer, according to a study conducted by the City.

“We’ve had general support from across the community, with exception of the current permit holders — and that’s understandable,” he added.

The new rate would be grandfathered in, meaning only new applicants would incur the updated costs.

Read the rest of the article on CBC News


The Silent Rise of HIV in Chile

VICE News has partnered with the University of British Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism and student journalists from the International Reporting Program for Hidden in Plain Sight: stories of HIV and migration in Chile.

Around the world the number of new HIV cases is steadily dropping.

But in Chile, one of South America’s most prosperous nations, the virus is on the rise. This spike in new cases is affecting some of the country’s most vulnerable populations, including young people, women and indigenous groups.

While authorities claim they are doing what they can to stop the spread of the disease, decisive action has been limited. An estimated 50 per cent of people living with the virus in Chile remain undiagnosed. In December last year, Planned Parenthood International ranked the country’s sex education policy the worst in Latin America.

VICE News correspondent Daniel Hernandez visited the towns in Chile with the highest HIV concentrations, and speaks to activists, medical professionals, and the community at large who have taken the fight against HIV/AIDS into their own hands.

Watch the documentary on VICE News

Read the corresponding print article “HIV is spreading in Chile — and lots of people don’t know they have it” written by my colleagues Peter Mothe, Natalie Walters, Codi Hauka and Konstantine Roccas


City of Vancouver set to increase housing options for families

 

If approved, the housing mix policy would mandate more units for families in new strata and rental developments. Photo by the Canadian Press.

If approved, the housing mix policy would mandate more units for families in new strata and rental developments. Photo by the Canadian Press.

Vancouver council will consider measures next week designed to increase the number of family homes in new strata and rental buildings.

New policies outlined in a staff report to council would alter the housing mix in new condos by increasing the number of two and three bedroom apartments to create more options for families.

According to an official statement from Mayor Gregor Robertson, the housing mix policy “will help make our neighbourhoods more family friendly and vibrant, and ensure that as Vancouver grows, families can find housing options that work for them.”

Under the proposal, developers would have to ensure at least 35 per cent of the apartments in a new building contain two or three bedrooms to accommodate families.

The policy would apply to rezonings city-wide and would supersede existing family housing requirements in council-approved community plans such as Joyce-Collingwood or the Cambie Corridor.

Read the full article on CBC News


Psychiatrist shortage prompts online mental health services for Cranbrook youth

The province extends its Tele-mental Health program to bring online psychiatric care to youth in Cranbrook. Photo by www.ihcproviders.com

The province extends its Tele-mental Health program to bring online psychiatric care to youth in Cranbrook. Photo by http://www.ihcproviders.com

Children and teens in need of mental health services in Cranbrook will now get access to psychiatrists via the web. The Ministry of Children and Family Development has announced it will extend its Tele-mental Health program to the city.

The online videoconferencing service gives youth one-on-one bi-monthly consultations with psychiatrists in conjunction with B.C. Children’s Hospital. The psychiatrists will also visit their patients once every two months.

The program is currently offered in other more remote locations around B.C.

“The technology of telehealth has really expanded the opportunity to provide care to more rural and remote areas of BC,” said Dr. Susan Baer, a child and adolescent psychiatrist and director of outpatient mental health services at B.C. Children’s Hospital in Vancouver.

Baer is one of the psychiatrists who will be working with the Tele-mental Health program to offer treatment to children in Cranbrook.

Read the rest of the article on CBC News


It’s alive! ‘The blob’ lingers at new depth, scientists say

The blob's heat signature on the surface of the Northeast Pacific has diminished over the last six months, but new findings suggest it's sitting deeper below the surface. Photo by NOAA.

The blob’s heat signature on the surface of the Northeast Pacific has diminished over the last six months, but new findings suggest it’s sitting deeper below the surface. Photo by NOAA.

The giant ocean ‘blob’ isn’t dead — yet.

The warm patch of water that stretches along the Pacific Coast is currently resting several hundred metres below the surface of the ocean, despite earlier reports that it had dissipated, according to new data.

“What we’re finding is that the upper waters are being mixed by the wind again and coming back to normal temperatures, but the residual effect of the blob is still there at about 150 to 200 metres [below the surface],” said  Ian Perry, a senior research scientist with Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

The blob was widely pronounced dead earlier this year after satellite heat images no longer detected abnormally warm waters on the surface of the Pacific Coast. However, the imaging only read up to 40 metres below the surface, said Perry.

Vertical measurements conducted by the DFO’s Canadian Coast Guard vessels indicate the blob now lives deeper below the surface. According to Perry, at this depth the warm water continues to prevent the mixing of nutrients to the ocean’s upper-layer, which has harmed coastal ecosystems over the past two years.

Marine wildlife, including Pacific salmon, have suffered as a result of what’s been dubbed a ‘marine heatwave’.

Read the full article on CBC News